What Hollywood has in common with Washington DC by Taylor Marsh

Taylor Marsh photoTaylor Marsh writes smart, arousing romance while deciphering world events. She lives in the Beltway area of Washington D.C.

Beltway Betrayers, Book 2 of The Beltway Series, will be out in May 2017 and Book 3 of this series will be out in the fall.

She is a former Broadway performer and beauty queen who was the Relationship Consultant for LA Weekly, then the nation’s top alternative newsweekly. Taylor is the author of two traditionally published non-fiction books, The Hillary Effect, and her memoir, The Sexual Education of a Beauty Queen.

Taylor was profiled in The Washington Post and The New Republic for her coverage of Hillary Clinton during the 2008 Democratic primary season. She became a contributor to The Huffington Post in 2006 and has written for Washington, D.C.’s The Hill, as well as for U.S. News & World Report and for Zócalo Public Square in Los Angeles, among others.

As a seasoned entertainer, communicator and speaker, Taylor have also been interviewed by The Los Angeles Times, Al Jazeera Media NetworkThe New York Times, BBC, CNN, MSNBC, and C-SPAN’s Washington Journal, among other outlets.

Why did you set your book in Washington, D.C., & Los Angeles?

The people who reside in or nearby these metropolises absorb the ego accumulated by the history made in them over decades.

The glamour and power that is Hollywood is unparalleled, and it remains one of the last bastions of male dominance.

It’s just one thing Hollywood has in common with Washington, D.C.

The pageantry and anointed royalty of Hollywood was born many decades ago in the Golden Age of cinema.

It wasn’t until the era of John F. Kennedy and Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy that Washington became the center of the world, with beautiful people commanding the ultimate power.

Hollywood had moved east. The world revolved around a swamp area populated by some of the most gorgeous creatures living off the lushest land imaginable, none of them human.

These two cities lend themselves to a psychological thriller (romance) because the continual competition can make for fragile egos, short-lived romances, and lethal battles of will. Continue reading