Excerpt: A Charmed Little Lie by Sharla Lovelace

Charmed Little Lie book coverTitle: A Charmed Little Lie (Charmed in Texas #1) by Sharla Lovelace
Release: April 18, 2017
Published by: Lyrical Shine

Synopsis

Lanie Barrett didn’t mean to lie. Spinning a story of a joyous marriage to make a dying woman happy is forgivable, isn’t it? Lanie thinks so, especially since her beloved Aunt Ruby would have been heartbroken to know the truth of her niece’s sadly loveless, short-of-sparkling existence. Trouble is, according to the will, Ruby didn’t quite buy Lanie’s tale. And to inherit the only house Lanie ever really considered a home, she’ll have to bring her “husband” back to Charmed, Texas for three whole months—or watch Aunt Ruby’s cozy nest go to her weasel cousin, who will sell it to a condo developer.

Nick McKane is out of work, out of luck, and the spitting image of the man Lanie described. He needs money for his daughter’s art school tuition, and Lanie needs a convenient spouse. It’s a match made . . . well, not quite in heaven, but for a temporary arrangement, it couldn’t be better. Except the longer Lanie and Nick spend as husband and wife, the more the connection between them begins to seem real. Maybe this modern fairy tale really could come true . . . Continue reading

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What you can learn about book marketing from HGTV

In case you didn’t know Selling New York is a reality based series on one of my favorite cable channels, HGTV. I don’t have cable so thanks to Netflix  I am getting my favorite shows where I can indulge for a few hours of binge watching.

So here’s the premise of Selling New York as stated on Wikipedia: Features real estate brokers from three Manhattan real estate companies (Gumley Haft Kleier, CORE, and Warburg) selling real estate to New York’s elite.

New York City from Empire State Building

By Filippo Diotalevi [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Here’s how I see it … I love real estate and I never miss an opportunity for an open house, especially if the property is waaay over my pay grade. Is it curiosity or some fascination with the way the other half live? Well, it’s a bit of both, plus the characters I write about would live in places like those, so we could call it research. Yes, let’s call it research. Another love of mine is business. Here’s what the math look like so far:

Real estate + business + research = Selling New York!

Here is what you can learn about book marketing from watching Selling New York.

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Interview with Jordan Locke

Interview with Jordan Locke

Were you always good at English?

Honestly, English was not my best subject in school. When I was younger, I never, ever thought I would someday be writing novels.

When did you decide to become a writer?

I had an idea for a scene for a book or movie, wrote a few pages and stuck it in a drawer. Four years later, while listening to a radio show about books, the ideas started coming, and I HAD to write them down. In a couple of weeks, I wrote the entire plot.

Do you write full-time or part-time?

I write at night and on the weekends. Most of us writers have day jobs.

Do you work to an outline or plot, or do you prefer to just see where an idea takes you?

I have a very rough idea of a plot and characters and just start writing.

How long on average does it take you to write a book?

About a year—a few months for a first draft, and then six to nine months of editing.

Tell us about the cover and how it came about.

I’m a graphic designer in my day job, so I designed the cover myself. The idea, a graphic depiction of rows of females and only one male, came to me while I was writing the book. When I designed the cover, I added the teenage boy holding the page to give it a human touch.

Do you think that the cover plays an important part in the buying process?

Definitely. It’s a potential reader’s first impression. Of course, it’s the writing that’s going to convince them whether or not to buy the book.

How are you publishing this book and why?

My agent was unable to sell The Only Boy to major publishers (many of them had overfilled their quotas for dystopian novels), so I decided to publish it myself.

What would you say are the main advantages and disadvantages of self-publishing versus being traditionally published?

Advantages: You have more control when you self-publish, and you can get your book out really quickly. Disadvantages: You have to do everything yourself (design, edit, market, etc.), and your chance of success is much, much lower.

What advice would you give to aspiring writers?

Persistence is key. Keep reading, keep writing and keep learning the craft. Continue reading